A Crossroad

A friend of mine sent me a link to an article in the Sunday Times written by David Davis exlaining why he felt he had no choice but to resign, it was an interesting article with which there is little to disagree on. It is interesting that even Peter Mandelson, a former EU Commissoner and general all round “EU Luvvie” considers Theresa May’s ‘offer’ so bad that he feels that a No Deal Brexit or Remaining in the EU would be a better outcome for Britain.

However the unfortunate aspect to negotiating Brexit has not been Brussels but the UK Remainers who dominate the Media and “Chattering Urban Classes” who have refused to accept the result of the Referendum, this has given comfort to our “enemies” and made May’s job even tougher than it should be and the result is this pig’s ear proposal but as they say, “it ain’t over until the fat lady sings”. Continue Reading →

Consumer Fatigue

It started with some comments on YouTube but as I thought through the implications, I started to feel that what is true of cameras, which is where this started, might also be true of very many other product areas and that has broader implications for the global economy.

As my passion is photography, over time I have found a handful of people who post camera revues and vlogs about photography in general on YouTube they are always worth watching whenever they publish a new material, one of these is a chap called David Thorpe. Continue Reading →

This Isn’t So Easy

When I was 21, I worked with an Engineer who was a older than me and a lot more experienced, I still remember something he told me then about project work. “Despite your best efforts, every project you meet will cost twice as much as the estimate and take twice as long to complete.” It was sound advice and although it was to be decades before anybody called me a “Project Manager”, for the majority of my working life, that is what I was actually doing. Continue Reading →

Looking Back on Brexit

As I’m making a fresh start with this website though it is taking rather longer than intended as I create totally new content, I thought that I might end here with doing a tidy up on one particular current affairs topic and that is Brexit or more specifically, my views on Brexit so that moving forwards, I can avoid constantly returning to it because the whole subject has got all quite tedious for the vast majority of us.

Before I trash all the previous content on this site, I find that I had posted some 261 articles since October 2014 when I had last refreshed this content and site design, of them 192 were on “Current Affairs” and probably 60% of those were on the topic of Brexit or things related to it so the question is, how can you write so much crap on just one topic ? Continue Reading →

Taking Longer

Many years ago when I was very young, an engineer told me something which broadly speaking has always turned out to be fairly true: “Every project takes twice as long as you think it will and costs about twice as much as you budgeted for.” In rebuilding this website this is pretty true, the cost may be negligible but the time isn’t.

The thing that has slowed it down is not really the design work, it is fitting the design to the content and establishing clearly what that content going forward will be because I want it totally different from what this currently is so, I will just take a little to get the changes done 🙂

Time to Upgrade

I started writing this blog back in November 2007 and at the time dis so in part, because I wondered if I could sustain the effort required to post frequently. That was an interesting experience if only because it demonstrated just how difficult it must be for journalists to not only write regular columns against a publication deadline but also to keep up a consistent quality in their content. Continue Reading →

The Problems of Change

Last year Mckinsey & Company issued an interesting study on the impacts of automation on the global economy, the following is a direct link to where you can download the PDFs: https://www.mckinsey.com/global-themes/future-of-organizations-and-work/what-the-future-of-work-will-mean-for-jobs-skills-and-wages

For an effective summary of the main thrust of that report, The Verge does a pretty good job: https://www.theverge.com/2017/11/30/16719092/automation-robots-jobs-global-800-million-forecast Continue Reading →

The Sound of Silence

Although at the root of it are two very different “past politicians” vying for some kind of relevancy in today’s world, they have formed an interesting conjunction with a perhaps unexpected result. Tony Blair insisting that with him in the frame, in a second referendum on the EU the British electorate will have come to their senses and vote for remain. Nigel Farage bored with not being the centre of attention any more, would welcome the opportunity to fight a second referendum.

Of course and despite the ardent desires of Remainers like the FT, The Economist, Blair, Clegg, Miller and the like, the possibility of another referendum has been greeted with total silence by the electorate. Continue Reading →

Revolution in the UK Economy Part 2

This is a second part to my thinking about the future direction of the UK economy and just as I touched on the NHS in my previous post, in this I will be using the Armed Forces as the basis of looking into the future. Rather like the NHS, the Armed Forces combine expensive hardware and the need for considerable manpower and all paid from tax payer funds.

Unlike the NHS though, armed forces spending is constantly being squeezed and budgets are always under extreme pressure but there is a problem with that because the forces need to combine being a deterrent to potential aggressors with always being action ready so there is only so much cutting that can be done. Continue Reading →

Revolution in the UK Economy Part 1

One of the most interesting things about the Labour Party under Corbyn is how it has reverted to a world view based upon Marxist principles including public ownership of the ‘means of production and distribution’. Whilst this is in part a knee jerk reaction in trying to distance themselves from Blair and New Labour, it is also quite amusing in that it totally misses the point that there may be the case for State intervention but it certainly won’t be as they imagine it.

In fact before deciding on policies, they would be best first discussing the role of the State in a modern society rather than 100 years ago, where it has both a place and a duty to intervene plus where it does not and should never interfere. This is the first part of a two part post where I am musing about possible futures. Continue Reading →